Archive for September, 2011

Get Set For A Blast Of Chilly Air
September 29, 2011

Even before September 2011 ends tomorrow, the weather headline to summarize the month can already be written:  Warmer and Wetter Than Normal.  With a day to go, the month is already at the top of the list of wettest Septembers in Baltimore since official records started in 1871.  The 13.32″ of rainfall this month tops the 12.41″ that fell in September of 1934.  In fact, this soggy September has been the third wettest month of all-time, falling behind only August of 1955 which had 18.35″ of rain, and August of 1933 which had 13.83″.

With one more mild day in the forecast, the average temperature for the month is expected to be more than a degree above the normal 67.8F.

Deep low pressure slides into the mid Atlantic Saturday afternoon

Coldest air of the new Fall season invades the mid Atlantic Saturday afternoon

RPM model shows snow in the West Virginia mountains at 2pm Saturday

October, however, will arrive with a much different feel.  Deep low pressure in the upper atmosphere is expected to drop south and east from the Great Lakes toward the mid Atlantic region on Saturday.  Cold air will sweep in with the low, dropping temperatures to their lowest levels since last Spring.  The highest mountains of western Maryland and West Virginia may even see some wet snow mixing with the rain showers on Saturday.  Time to find those jackets and sweatshirts!

Tom Tasselmyer

 

 

Advertisements

Impressive Two Month Rain Totals
September 25, 2011

Rainfall this week was impressive and, as Tom pointed out in the previous post, record breaking.

August and September have been extremely wet with the remnants of Irene and Lee being big contributors. The September 22 deluge was not related to any storm remnant. It just came from a tropical airmass. In combination, the August-September rain totals are impressive.

The rainfall on September 22 was a record breaker at BWI-Marshall but many areas exceeded the airport measurement. Below are reports from the National Weather Service on rain totals at different locations around the area.

John Collins

 

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
SPOTTER REPORTS
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE BALTIMORE MD/WASHINGTON DC
409 PM EDT SAT SEP 24 2011

THE FOLLOWING ARE UNOFFICIAL OBSERVATIONS TAKEN DURING THE PAST
32 HOURS FOR THE STORM THAT HAS BEEN AFFECTING OUR REGION.
APPRECIATION IS EXTENDED TO HIGHWAY DEPARTMENTS...COOPERATIVE
OBSERVERS...SKYWARN SPOTTERS AND MEDIA FOR THESE REPORTS.  THIS
SUMMARY IS ALSO AVAILABLE ON OUR HOME PAGE AT WEATHER.GOV/BALTIMORE

********************STORM TOTAL RAINFALL********************

LOCATION          STORM TOTAL     TIME/DATE   COMMENTS
                     RAINFALL           OF
                     /INCHES/   MEASUREMENT

MARYLAND

...ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY...
   1 N BALT-WASH INTL A  3.19   800 AM  9/24  ASOS

...BALTIMORE CITY...
   1 SSE DOWNTOWN BALTI  3.02   800 AM  9/24  ASOS

...CALVERT COUNTY...
   2 N HUNTINGTOWN       1.66  1100 PM  9/23  NWS RETIREE

...FREDERICK COUNTY...
   1 NNE BRADDOCK HEIGH  2.00  1211 PM  9/23  PUBLIC

...PRINCE GEORGES COUNTY...
   1 SSE FOREST HEIGHTS  1.53  1240 PM  9/23  CO-OP OBSERVER

**********************24 HOUR RAINFALL**********************

LOCATION              24 HOUR     TIME/DATE   COMMENTS
                     RAINFALL           OF
                     /INCHES/   MEASUREMENT

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

...DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA...
   NATIONAL ARBORETUM    1.27   800 AM  9/24  CO-OP OBSERVER

MARYLAND

...ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY...
   ENE LINTHICUM         3.57  1100 PM  9/23  COCORAHS
   1 WSW ODENTON         2.91   700 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   2 NNE CROFTON         2.83   700 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   3 SSW SOUTH GATE      2.68   800 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   2 W SEVERN            2.63   700 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   1 NNW PAROLE          2.05   800 AM  9/24  TRAINED SPOTTER
   1 NE GREEN HAVEN      1.94   600 AM  9/24  CO-OP OBSERVER
   ESE GREEN HAVEN       1.81   700 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   2 ENE SEVERNA PARK    1.79   700 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   3 ESE PASADENA        1.73   800 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   4 W ANNAPOLIS         1.66   600 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   1 SE PASADENA         1.58   700 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   3 E LAUREL            1.42   800 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   1 NE HERALD HARBOR    1.39   730 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   1 SE DEALE            1.18   700 AM  9/24  COCORAHS

...BALTIMORE COUNTY...
   1 NE ROSSVILLE        4.48   800 AM  9/24  TRAINED SPOTTER
   1 NNE ROSEDALE        4.13   700 AM  9/24  TRAINED SPOTTER
   1 E KINGSVILLE        2.92   700 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   2 ESE WHITE MARSH     2.80   700 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   3 ENE TOWSON          2.12   700 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   1 SW LONG GREEN       2.03   700 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   3 WNW BALDWIN         2.03   800 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   1 ENE CATONSVILLE     1.23   800 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   1 SW JACKSONVILLE     1.07   800 AM  9/24  COCORAHS

...CALVERT COUNTY...
   2 NNW DUNKIRK         2.90   630 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   6 E MARLTON           2.58   700 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   1 W PRINCE FREDERICK  1.87   700 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   NORTH BEACH           1.67   700 AM  9/24  CO-OP OBSERVER

...CARROLL COUNTY...
   SE MOUNT AIRY         0.90   700 AM  9/24  COCORAHS

...CHARLES COUNTY...
   1 SW BRYANS ROAD      2.80   645 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   4 SSE WALDORF         2.33   500 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   2 W WALDORF           2.28   620 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   2 E WALDORF           1.88   700 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   3 S WALDORF           1.85   800 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   3 WNW LA PLATA        1.52   700 AM  9/24  COCORAHS

...FREDERICK COUNTY...
   2 ESE MIDDLETOWN      1.31   700 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   3 SE MYERSVILLE       1.16   800 AM  9/24  PUBLIC
   4 SSW FREDERICK       1.10   700 AM  9/24  COCORAHS

...HARFORD COUNTY...
   4 WNW HAVRE DE GRACE  3.64   700 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   SE WHITEFORD          3.53   800 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   2 ENE DARLINGTON      3.25   800 AM  9/24  CO-OP OBSERVER

   2 W BEL AIR           3.23   700 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   4 WNW FALLSTON        2.34   600 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   1 N JARRETTSVILLE     1.58   800 AM  9/24  COCORAHS

...HOWARD COUNTY...
   2 N COLUMBIA          1.07   700 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   2 N ELLICOTT CITY     1.05   700 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   1 E COLUMBIA          1.05   700 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   2 W ELKRIDGE          0.93   700 AM  9/24  COCORAHS

...PRINCE GEORGES COUNTY...
   ESE CAMP SPRINGS      2.46   700 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   2 SE SUITLAND         2.44   700 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   4 SSE BOWIE           2.44   700 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   7 ESE BRANDYWINE      2.36   700 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   2 NNE BOWIE           2.32   800 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   1 W FORESTVILLE       2.30   700 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   2 NNW CAMP SPRINGS    2.30   700 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   1 SSE FOREST HEIGHTS  2.29   700 AM  9/24  CO-OP OBSERVER
   1 W OXON HILL         2.29   700 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   2 SE FOREST HEIGHTS   2.25   700 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   1 E BOWIE             2.23   600 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   2 S LAUREL            1.33   800 AM  9/24  COCORAHS

...ST. MARYS COUNTY...
   4 ENE CHARLOTTE HALL  1.80   700 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   2 S GOLDEN BEACH      1.80   700 AM  9/24  CO-OP OBSERVER
   1 N RIDGE             1.13   700 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   1 NE LEONARDTOWN      1.05   600 AM  9/24  COCORAHS

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
SPOTTER REPORTS
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE MOUNT HOLLY NJ
748 PM EDT SAT SEP 24 2011

THE FOLLOWING ARE UNOFFICIAL OBSERVATIONS TAKEN DURING THE PAST 20 HOURS
FOR THE STORM THAT HAS BEEN AFFECTING OUR REGION.  APPRECIATION IS EXTENDED
TO HIGHWAY DEPARTMENTS...COOPERATIVE OBSERVERS...SKYWARN SPOTTERS
AND MEDIA FOR THESE REPORTS.  THIS SUMMARY IS ALSO AVAILABLE ON OUR
HOME PAGE AT WEATHER.GOV/PHI

********************STORM TOTAL RAINFALL********************

LOCATION          STORM TOTAL     TIME/DATE   COMMENTS
                     RAINFALL           OF
                     /INCHES/   MEASUREMENT

PENNSYLVANIA

...MONTGOMERY COUNTY...
   AMBLER                1.55  1200 AM  9/24

**********************24 HOUR RAINFALL**********************

LOCATION              24 HOUR     TIME/DATE   COMMENTS
                     RAINFALL           OF
                     /INCHES/   MEASUREMENT

DELAWARE

...KENT COUNTY...
   3 SSE SMYRNA          0.93   700 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   6 WNW DOVER           0.87   700 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   2 SE MARYDEL          0.80   700 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   4 NE FELTON           0.61   800 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   2 NW MAGNOLIA         0.44   800 AM  9/24  COCORAHS

...NEW CASTLE COUNTY...
   7 W CLAYTON           3.26   700 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   5 N NEWARK            2.79   700 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   3 NNE MIDDLETOWN      2.21   700 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   2 SE GLASGOW          2.20   700 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   6 NNE MIDDLETOWN      2.18   700 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   4 SSW NEWARK          2.07   700 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   2 WNW NEWPORT         1.71   700 AM  9/24  COCORAHS

...SUSSEX COUNTY...
   4 E DELMAR            0.46   700 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   6 W GEORGETOWN        0.34   800 AM  9/24  COCORAHS

MARYLAND

...CAROLINE COUNTY...
   6 WSW DENTON          0.61   700 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   1 ENE GREENSBORO      0.52   700 AM  9/24  COCORAHS

...CECIL COUNTY...
   2 NNW ELKTON          2.73   700 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   7 NNW ELKTON          2.62   600 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   4 NNW ELKTON          1.97   700 AM  9/24  COCORAHS

...TALBOT COUNTY...
   1 SE ST. MICHAELS     3.76   800 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   1 NNW EASTON          1.05   240 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   3 NNE EASTON          1.01   800 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   1 SW EASTON           0.97   853 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   1 SSW EASTON          0.74   700 AM  9/24  COCORAHS
   4 NE TRAPPE           0.61   800 AM  9/24  COCORAHS

All-Time Wettest September
September 23, 2011

Two more wet weather records were broken on Friday.  The 3.19″ of rain at BWI-Marshall broke the old record for the 23rd of September of 3.13″ set back in 1907.  And, with Friday’s heavy rain, the monthly total precipitation stands at 12.76″, making this the wettest September on record for Baltimore since official weather records started back in 1871.  The old September record was 12.41″ set in 1934.  With a week to go in the month, and more showers in the weekend forecast, the benchmark for soggy Septembers will likely go higher.

Tom Tasselmyer

How Do the Leaves know it’s Fall?
September 21, 2011

How do the leaves know when it is time to change colors? They obviously can’t read a calendar, so instead, they have to rely on seasonal cues to let them know that fall is here, and winter is on the way.

To understand why leaves change color during the fall, we first have to understand what makes them green in the first place. Plants make their own food through a process called photosynthesis, using ingredients like Carbon Dioxide, Water and Sunlight. But none of this would be possible, without their secret ingredient, Chlorophyll. Chlorophyll is a chemical that allows the plants to convert sunlight into energy. Chlorophyll also happens to give leaves their green color. Underneath this green, other colors are present but remain hidden until the fall season.

As the days get shorter, plants start preparing for winter. Much like a bear hibernates for winter, plants go through a hibernation phase as well. Less sunlight means less energy available for photosynthesis. In order to conserve energy during the winter months, plants stop producing chlorophyll which causes the green color to slowly fade from the leaves. In its place, hidden hues like yellow, orange and red, are finally able to take center stage.

But what makes some years autumn colors more spectacular than others? It turns out that weather plays an important role in the intensity of the fall colors. A summer drought can delay the onset of the colors, an early frost can speed them up, and a warm fall can prolong the colors but lower their intensity. The most vibrant autumn colors seem to come from years with a mild and wet spring, followed by a fall with sunny days but cool nights.

The leaves have already begun to change across Maryland, but check out the map below to see when the peak colors arrive for each area of the Northeast:

Ava Marie

Ocean City Tornado Confirmed
September 19, 2011

The National Weather Service in Wakefield, VA has confirmed that the Thursday afternoon storm over Ocean City did produce a tornado. According to the report the “…tornado originally touched down just west of Ocean City in Assawomen Bay…and weakend as it moved toward Ocean City”.

John Collins

Stormy Ocean City
September 17, 2011

A suprisingly strong thunderstorm hit Ocean City on Thursday, September 15. It developed as a rain shower over southern Delaware in the 2:00pm hour and by 3:30pm it was looming over Ocean City with not only rain but the distinct cloud signature of a tornado. As of Friday evening the National Weather Service had not yet made a determination as to the status of the storm but pictures provided wbaltv.com show that either a tornado, funnel cloud or water spot had dropped out of the storm cell. Some minor damage was caused by the storm.

The image below from the National Weather Service Doppler Radar at Dover AFB shows the storm cell over the barrier island at 3:30pm, the time at which the possible tornado was reported to have occured.

The storm moved out over the Atlantic fairly quickly. The National Weather Service reported that there was damage to a building on 75th and Ocean Front with a condo roof on the beach. The same report stated that there was an unconfirmed funnel cloud associated with the storm.

Back in 1999, Ocean City was hit by a storm of a different scale.

The image above shows Hurricane Floyd approaching the southeast coast of the U.S. On September 16, Floyd hit the coast over the Carolinas and move toward the DELMARVA peninsula. By the time the eye of the storm reached coastal Maryland it was downgraded to a tropical storm with 60 mph sustained winds. Floyd was one of the more significant tropical cyclones to hit Maryland.

John Collins

Aftermath of the “Big Rain”
September 14, 2011

The summer started out hot and dry. July rainfall was just over an inch below the seasonal average. 24 days hit 90 degrees or hotter and three days recorded temperatures in the low 100s.

August flipped on rainfall, recording 10.38 inches at BWI-Marshall (7.09 inches above average) and so far September has followed suit in the first half of the month with 9.38 inches of rain at BWI-Marshall (7.77 inches above average) with some areas recording more than 11 inches of rain.

The most recent rains have pushed the 2011 precipitation total to 42.32 inches, 12.86 inches above average.

Last week’s rain totals from the remnants of Tropical Storm Lee were the most spectacular. The National Weather Service in Sterling, VA reported that the Bowie area recorded 4.57 inches of rain in 3 hours on Wednesday, September 7. That is a once in 200 year event. The rainfall in Ellicott City and Upper Marlboro on that day was a 50-100 year event. Westview rainfall was a 10-25 year event.

Two Weeks of Rain Swamps Eastern U.S.

From Hurricane Irene to Tropical Storm Lee, the Eastern U.S. has seen a seemingly endless stream of rainfall over the past two weeks. This image plots all rainfall from August 26 – September 9, 2011, as analyzed by the National Weather Service’s River Forecast Centers. The measurements use a combination of radar, rain gauges and satellite rainfall estimates. The largest rainfall totals, almost 3 feet so far, are seen in Northern Virginia through New York. More rainfall is expected throughout the weekend, possibly up to 7 inches. Flooding throughout the Susquehanna River and watershed has prompted the president to declare states of emergency in Pennsylvania. The Susquehanna crested today at around 39 feet. At least 5 deaths have been attributed to the flooding. (Source: NOAA)

The NOAA image above shows the rainfall concentrations over a two week period. The image below shows the impact all of that rain had on the Chesapeake Bay.

Rain and Runoff in the Chesapeake

The Chesapeake Bay is part of the largest watershed in the Northeast U.S. It receives river and stream input from much of Central New York through Virginia, including the Susquehanna and Potomac Rivers. Over the past two weeks, this same region has received in excess of 32” of rain in some areas. The Susquehanna River experienced record flood levels. All of this rain and runoff eventually has made its way into the Chesapeake Bay. The result can be seen here in this total suspended matter data acquired by the NASA Aqua satellite and processed by NOAA CoastWatch. Before (August 23rd) and after (September 11th) images show stark differences in the amount of suspended matter (silt, mud, debris) found in the waters of the Chesapeake and its tributaries. Water conditions caused the modification of the Nation’s Triathlon held in DC on September 11th due to poor water quality, currents, and debris.

Suspended matter poses a hazard to the Chesapeake Bay by reducing the Bay’s water quality. Oysters that normally filter the water can be smothered by the sediment. In addition, sediment reduces the light needed by sea-grass beds, which ordinarily provide nursery grounds for many species of fish and crabs. The restoration of oysters and sea grasses has been a priority in efforts to revive the health of the Bay, but catastrophic events such as those brought by Tropical Storm Lee hamper these efforts. Management practices that will bring about long-term reduction in sediment and nutrient pollution from upstream agricultural and urban/suburban sources, will have a positive impact on the Bay by making the Bay more resilient when catastrophic events occur. (Source: NOAA)

Most of this excessive rain came from tropical moisture, some of it related to tropical cyclones. These storms have an interesting effect on the ocean waters that they pass over. tropical storms and hurricanes thrive on warm water but as a storm passes over the water, the sea surface temperature cools down as demonstrated in the NOAA image below.

The Wake of Katia and Nate

Hurricanes cool ocean temperatures by absorbing energy from the water and by churning up colder water from below. There is no better way to show this process than by looking at the sea surface temperature after a storm. In this case, the image shown here compares the satellite sea surface temperature data from September 12, 2011 to the average for that day over the 1981-2000 time period. The signatures of Hurricane Katia and Tropical Storm Nate are clearly visible as areas of colder than normal water in areas that are otherwise warmer than average. Similar features can also be seen in the actual sea surface temperature data from the same day (below). (Source: NOAA)

The hurricane season is still in full swing, although there is only one active storm in the Atlantic Basin at this time.

A slight shift in the weather pattern could allow for an increase in tropical activity and additional opportunities for soaking rains. Stay tuned.

John Collins

 

Between Lee And Katia Showers Linger
September 9, 2011

Satellite images this Friday morning show hurricane Katia passing well east of the mid Atlantic states, while the remnants of tropical storm Lee fade away over the Ohio valley to our west.  Rainfall totals from Lee’s remnants continue to be tallied, but the latest update from the National Weather Service includes some impressive numbers, including 15″ near Elizabethtown in Lancaster Co., PA!

REMNANTS OF LEE ADVISORY NUMBER 32
NWS HYDROMETEOROLOGICAL PREDICTION CENTER CAMP SPRINGS MD AL132011
1100 AM EDT FRI SEP 9 2011

...THE HEAVY RAINS ASSOCIATED WITH THE REMNANTS OF LEE ARE SLOWLY
DIMINISHING ACROSS THE MID-ATLANTIC STATES...

SUMMARY OF 1100 AM EDT...1500 UTC...INFORMATION
-----------------------------------------------
LOCATION...NO DISCERNIBLE SURFACE CIRCULATION

WATCHES AND WARNINGS
--------------------
FLASH FLOOD WATCHES HAVE BEEN ISSUED FOR CENTRAL MARYLAND AND
NORTHERN VIRGINIA.  RIVER FLOOD WARNINGS REMAIN IN EFFECT ACROSS
PARTS OF THE NORTHERN MID-ATLANTIC STATES...UPSTATE NEW YORK...AND
SOUTHERN NEW ENGLAND.

FOR INFORMATION SPECIFIC TO YOUR AREA...INCLUDING POSSIBLE WATCHES
AND WARNINGS...PLEASE MONITOR PRODUCTS ISSUED BY YOUR LOCAL
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE OFFICE AT WWW.WEATHER.GOV.
ALBERTVILLE

DISCUSSION AND 48-HOUR OUTLOOK
------------------------------
AT 1100 AM EDT...1500 UTC...THERE WAS NO DISCERNIBLE SURFACE
CIRCULATION FOR LEE. THE LARGE SCALE EXTRATROPICAL LOW THAT HAS
ABSORBED THE CIRCULATION OF LEE IS LOCATED OVER THE UPPER OHIO
RIVER VALLEY AND IS EXPECTED TO WEAKEN THROUGH SATURDAY MORNING.
TROPICAL MOISTURE STREAMING UP FROM THE ATLANTIC WILL CONTINUE TO
BE LIFTED OVER A DISSIPATING STATIONARY BOUNDARY ACROSS THE
MID-ATLANTIC STATES ON FRIDAY...LEADING TO THE POTENTIAL FOR
ANOTHER ROUND OF HEAVY RAIN ACROSS THE REGION ON FRIDAY...ALBEIT
LESS THAN WHAT WAS OBSERVED ON THURSDAY.

HAZARDS
-------
RAINFALL...ADDITIONAL RAINFALL AMOUNTS OF UP TO AN INCH WILL BE
POSSIBLE ACROSS MARYLAND AND PARTS OF THE NORTHERN MID-ATLANTIC
STATES THROUGH SUNDAY...WITH HIGHER AMOUNTS POSSIBLE IN ISOLATED
LOCATIONS.

RAINFALL TOTALS
---------------
SELECTED STORM TOTAL RAINFALL IN INCHES THROUGH 11 AM EDT 

...ALABAMA...
FYFFE 6.3 NNE                       12.94
MOBILE 10.2 WSW                     12.93
ALBERTVILLE 4.8 WNW                 12.44
TILLMANS CORNER 4.3 WNW             11.74
GRAND BAY 0.6 NW                    11.32
ORANGE BEACH 3.0 ENE                10.50
FOLEY 2.0 SSW                       10.39
ENSLEY                               9.54
GUNTERSVILLE                         8.95
BIRMINGHAM MUNI ARPT                 8.30
GADSDEN MUNI ARPT                    7.18
TUSCALOOSA MUNI ARPT                 7.17
MUSCLE SHOALS RGNL ARPT              6.21
HUNTSVILLE/MADISON CO. ARPT          5.72                      

...CONNECTICUT...
BLACK ROCK LAKE                      6.23
DANBURY MUNI ARPT                    5.74
WINDSOR LOCKS 1 WNW                  5.66
HARTFORD/BRADLEY INTL ARPT           5.66
WALLINGFORD                          5.60
AVON                                 5.30
NORTH HAVEN                          5.22
BROOKFIELD 3.3 SSE                   5.05
STAMFORD                             4.90
GROTON/NEW LONDON                    4.81
ENFIELD                              4.74
GREENWICH                            4.17
HARTFORD 3 SE                        3.35                      

...WASHINGTON DC...
WASHINGTON/NATIONAL                  6.64                      

...DELAWARE...
NEWARK 5.3 N                         4.85
MILFORD                              4.60
NEWPORT 2.4 WNW                      4.06
WILMINGTON ARPT                      3.00
DOVER AFB                            3.00
GEORGETOWN/SUSSEX CO. ARPT           1.82                      

...FLORIDA...
MILTON 1.4 NNE                      10.03
NICEVILLE 4.5 SE                     7.35
PENSACOLA 3.8 N                      6.57
HURLBURT FIELD AWS                   6.50
WEST PENSACOLA 10.9 SW               6.35
DESTIN ARPT                          6.29
DESTIN AIRPORT                       6.29
ENSLEY 2.1 ENE                       6.10
PENSACOLA RGNL ARPT                  5.81
VALPARAISO/EGLIN AFB                 5.71
CRESTVIEW/BOB SIKES                  5.51
APALACHICOLA MUNI ARPT               5.49
PENSACOLA NAS                        3.91
TYNDALL AFB/PANAMA CITY              3.87
TALLAHASSEE RGNL ARPT                3.22                      

...GEORGIA...
LA FAYETTE 2.9 NE                   11.01
RINGGOLD 5 W                        10.21
TRENTON 5.8 S                        9.89
LYERLY 4.8 SSE                       9.14
LAFAYETTE 5 SW                       8.71
NAOMI 2 E                            7.88
NEW ENGLAND 2 SE                     7.84
CURRYVILLE 3 W                       6.81
ROME/RUSSELL FIELD                   6.26
CARTERSVILLE AIRPORT                 3.17                      

...KENTUCKY...
CRANKS CREEK RESERVOIR               5.49
FLATWOODS 0.5 WNW                    4.82
CUMBERLAND                           4.75
WHITESBURG                           4.00
BOWLING GREEN-WARREN CO. ARPT        3.93
ALBANY 5.3 W                         3.90
PLUM SPRINGS 0.8 NNW                 3.81
LONDON-CORBIN ARPT                   3.14
LEXINGTON/BLUE GRASS FIELD           3.09
FRANKFORT/CAPITAL CITY ARPT          2.27
JACKSON/J. CARROLL                   2.13                      

...LOUISIANA...
HOLDEN                              15.43
N.O. CAROLLTON                      14.32
MAUREPAS                            13.63
PONCHATOULA 4 SE                    13.22
CONVENT 2 S                         13.04
WESTWEGO 1.8 NE                     13.03
RESERVE 0.5 SSE                     12.89
GRAY 0.5 ENE                        12.15
NEW ORLEANS/MOISANT                 11.00
ZACHARY 3.5 WNW                      9.04
BATON ROUGE/RYAN MUNI ARPT           8.20
LAFAYETTE RGNL ARPT                  5.90
NEW ORLEANS NAS                      4.59
LAKE CHARLES MUNI ARPT               4.35                      

...MASSACHUSETTS...
BECKET                               9.06
LITTLE EGYPT 8 NW                    7.96
SHELBURNE                            6.83
GREENFIELD                           6.60
CHARLEMONT                           6.05
PITTSFIELD                           5.88
FAIRHAVEN                            5.52
SOUTHBRIDGE                          5.49
WILBRAHAM                            5.11
PLYMOUTH                             5.00
BLANDFORD                            5.00
WORCESTER MUNI ARPT                  4.88
PROVINCETOWN MUNI ARPT               4.04
BOSTON/LOGAN                         2.15                      

...MARYLAND...
WALDORF 3.6 SSE                     11.66
ELLICOTT CITY 1.7 N                 11.36
CLARKSBURG                          10.60
CROFTON 1.5 NNE                     10.21
PARKVILLE                            9.40
ANDREWS AFB/CAMP SPRINGS             9.20
BALTIMORE/WASHINGTON INTL ARPT       8.40
BALIMORE SCIENCE CENTER              6.92
ANNAPOLIS - US NAVAL ACADEMY         5.32
CONWINGO                             5.02
HAGERSTOWN RGNL ARPT                 4.21                      

...MAINE...
LINCOLN 4.3 NW                       3.08
GREENVILLE 2E                        2.85
MILLINOCKET MUNI ARPT                2.72
FRENCHVILLE                          2.11
HOULTON INTL ARPT                    2.01                      

...MISSISSIPPI...
WAVELAND 1.1 NW                     14.11
FLORENCE 0.9 E                      13.45
SAUCIER 6.4 ESE                     11.75
GULFPORT 2.0 NE                     11.71
LONG BEACH 0.7 S                    11.59
PASS CHRISTIAN 5.0 N                11.31
RICHLAND 0.3 WSW                    11.25
PHILADELPHIA 5.4 E                  11.18
JACKSON WFO                         11.15
GULFPORT-BILOXI                     11.14
PASCAGOULA                          10.96
HATTIESBURG/LAUREL                   8.12
TUPELO/C.D. LEMONS                   6.10
NATCHEZ/HARDY                        4.81
COLUMBUS AFB                         3.57                      

...NORTH CAROLINA...
BLOWING ROCK 2.8 ENE                 8.50
BOONE                                6.56
SPARTA 3.5 SSW                       6.01
LAUREL SPRINGS 3 WSW                 5.34
LENOIR                               5.28
FRANKLIN 7.5 SW                      4.93
CHAPEL HILL/WILLIAMS ARPT            2.25                      

...NEW HAMPSHIRE...
KEENE                                6.18
WEST SWANZEY 2 ENE                   5.48
WEST CHESTERFIELD                    5.22
MARLBOROUGH                          5.04
KEENE/DILLANT-HOPKINS ARPT           4.79
GILSUM                               3.96
MOUNT WASHINGTON                     3.60
NASHUA/BOIRE FIELD                   3.20
HUDSON                               3.06
JAFFREY MUNI ARPT                    3.04
MANCHESTER AIRPARK                   2.57
CONCORD MUNI ARPT                    2.50                      

...NEW JERSEY...
PHILLIPSBURG                         9.55
BETHLEHEM TWP 0.6 S                  9.34
LIBERTY TWP 1.7 WSW                  9.16
ANDOVER/AEROFLEX ARPT                8.70
ROCKAWAY                             8.43
SUSSEX ARPT                          7.39
RIEGELSVILLE                         6.86
LODI                                 6.42
WAYNE                                6.22
LYNDHURST                            6.19
LITTLE FALLS                         6.08
NEWARK INTL ARPT                     5.05
TRENTON/MERCER CO. ARPT              4.74                      

...NEW YORK...
APALACHIN 2.6 SE                    11.82
TIOGA TERRACE                       10.64
BINGHAMTON/BROOME                   10.09
PHOENICIA                            8.24
MONTGOMERY/ORANGE CO. ARPT           8.22
TANNERSVILLE                         7.60
WHITE PLAINS/WESTCHESTER CO. APT     6.80
ELMIRA/CORNING RGNL ARPT             5.70
POUGHKEEPSIE/DUTCHESS CO. ARPT       5.55
NEW YORK CITY                        5.33
ALBANY                               4.98
NEW YORK/LA GUARDIA                  4.19
SYRACUSE/HANCOCK                     3.26                      

...PENNSYLVANIA...
ELIZABETHTOWN 1.1 NNE               15.37
PINE GROVE                          14.70
PAXTONIA 1.7 E                      13.95
MIDDLETOWN/OLMSTED                  13.46
HARRISBURG AIRPORT                  13.30
MUIR AAF/INDIANTOWN                 12.58
LANCASTER 3 W                       12.56
WILLIAMSPORT                        10.20
SELINSGROVE/PENN VALLEY ARPT         9.35
YORK ARPT                            9.00
DOYLESTOWN ARPT                      7.35
ALLENTOWN-BETHLEHEM                  7.07
JOHNSTOWN/CAMBRIA CO. ARPT           6.58
READING/SPAATZ FIELD                 6.45
PHILADELPHIA INTL ARPT               6.37                      

...RHODE ISLAND...
WEST WARWICK                         5.20
EAST GREENWICH 2 ESE                 4.92
HOPE VALLEY                          4.85
BURRILLVILLE                         4.42
FOSTER                               4.22
WOONSOCKET                           4.11
PROVIDENCE/PO WARWICK                3.89
WEST GLOCESTER                       3.87
NEWPORT 4 NE                         3.35
COVENTRY                             3.02                      

...TENNESSEE...
CLEVELAND 3 ESE                     12.22
CHARLESTON                          11.50
APISON 2.7 SW                        9.59
RICEVILLE 3.7 WSW                    9.50
GEORGETOWN                           9.48
OAK RIDGE (ASOS)                     8.64
KNOXVILLE MUNI ARPT                  7.37
CROSSVILLE MEMORIAL ARPT             5.39
NASHVILLE METRO ARPT                 4.41
SMYRNA AIRPORT                       3.63
CHATTANOOGA-LOVELL FIELD (ASOS)      3.41
TRI-CITIES AIRPORT (ASOS)            2.43                      

...VIRGINIA...
FORT BELVOIR/DAVISON AFB            13.52
RESTON 2 N                          11.45
CHANTILLY 2 ESE                     10.18
HILLSVILLE 8.9 SE                    9.59
QUANTICO MCAF                        9.01
COPPER HILL 6.2 S                    8.89
BEDFORD 1.1 N                        6.95
WASHINGTON/DULLES                    6.62
WASHINGTON/NATIONAL                  6.16
MANASSAS MUNI ARPT                   6.16
ROANOKE MUNI ARPT                    6.14
RICHMOND/BYRD FIELD                  6.06
RICHMOND                             4.57                      

...VERMONT...
POWNAL                               6.61
EAST DUMMERSTON                      6.32
BRATTLEBORO 2 SW                     6.23
WOODFORD                             4.51
SPRINGFIELD/HARTNESS STATE ARPT      4.01
BENNINGTON/MORSE STATE ARPT          3.49
BURLINGTON INTL ARPT                 3.11
BARRE/MONTPELIER                     2.04                      

...WEST VIRGINIA...
BOOTHSVILLE 1.4 SE                   5.37
KEYSER 3.4 ESE                       5.19
MORGANTOWN/HART FIELD                5.13
BLUEFIELD/MERCER CO. ARPT            4.50
BECKLEY MEMORIAL ARPT                4.00
CLARKSBURG/BENEDUM ARPT              3.98
FAIRMONT                             3.88
MARTINSBURG RGNL ARPT                3.70
ELKINS/RANDOLPH FIELD                3.57
PARKERSBURG/WILSON                   2.69
WHEELING/OHIO CO. ARPT               2.41
HUNTINGTON/TRI-STATE ARPT            2.40

While Katia is moving rapidly away from the mid Atlantic coast, rough surf and dangerous rip currents can still be expected at the Maryland and Delaware beaches this weekend.

And while Katia and Lee loosen their grips on the region, we are reminded that we have actually just now reached the climatological peak of the hurricane season with tropical storms Nate and Maria in the Gulf and eastern Atlantic respectively.

 


Nate is expected to mainly impact eastern Mexico, and perhaps south Texas, over the next 5 days.  Maria is expected to become a hurricane as it tracks toward Puerto Rico and then the Bahamas.  Perhaps becoming a threat to parts of the eastern U.S. next week.

Tom Tasselmyer

Soaking Rains
September 8, 2011

The skies have opened up over the Mid Atlantic region since Monday.

The National Weather Service radar estimate for rainfall from Monday through Wednesday evening outlines an exceptionally heavy band of rain along the western shore of the Bay. The heaviest concentrations are highlighted in red and indicate rain totals in the 6-8 inch range. Baltimore, Howard and Anne Arundel counties are among the hardest hit.

Source: NOAA

The culprit is the remnant of what was Tropical Storm Lee. The disturbance and the plume of moisture associated with it have focused the rain right over the area. The Wednesday evening surface weather map above shows a stationary front just to the north and west of the Bay and an almost continuous line of thunderstorms has been moving along the east side of the front, in the tropical air mass that contains an abundant supply of moisture. The north-south alignment and movement of the storms is referred to as “training”. The low pressure center and front are expected to be stalled in the area until sometime later in the day Thursday. Also shown on the map are the outer isobars of Hurricane Katia.

The Wednesday evening satellite image provides an interesting view of all of the tropical activity in the Atlantic/Caribbean/Gulf basins. Katia is expected to remain east of the U.S. coastline but may stir up the surf. Maria and Nate are tropical storms. It appears that Maria is headed toward the Caribbean Islands and will have to be monitored. Nate is forecast to head toward the northeast Mexican Gulf coast. A new wave is coming off the West African Coast and appears to be fairly vigorous.

Keep dry.

John Collins

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Drought Buster Named Lee
September 3, 2011

Tropical Storm Lee 10:45pm EDT Friday 2 Sep 2011

U.S. Drought Monitor as of 30 Aug 2011

5 Day Rainfall Forecast 3 Sep 2011 - 7 Sep 2011

Tropical Storm Lee is expected to make landfall on the Louisiana coast this weekend, an area suffering from what the National Weather Service categorizes as an “exceptional to severe” drought.  As of Friday afternoon, rainfall for the year is running 7.49″ below normal in New Orleans.  Other rainfall deficits for the year so far include:

Jackson, Mississippi:  11.87″ below normal

Pensacola, Florida:  14.25″ below normal

Mobile, Alabama:  16.57″ below normal

Lee is forecast to dump 10-15″ of rain on much of this parched area over the next 5 days; a mixture of drought busting downpours and dangerous floods.  Some of the tropical moisture from Lee will surge north along the Appalachian mountains, enhancing showers chances here in the mid Atlantic Monday through Wednesday.

Tom Tasselmyer