Hurricane Watch For Maryland & Delaware Beaches

The 11:00 a.m. update on hurricane Earl from the National Hurricane Center indicates the storm has weakened, but only slightly.  It is located about 725 miles south/southeast of Cape Hatteras and has dropped from category 4 to category 3 on the Saffir-Simpson scale with maximum sustained winds of 125 mph near the center of the storm.

BULLETIN
HURRICANE EARL ADVISORY NUMBER  29
NWS TPC/NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER MIAMI FL     AL072010
1100 AM EDT WED SEP 01 2010

...LARGE HURRICANE EARL THREATENS PORTIONS OF THE MID ATLANTIC
COAST...HURRICANE WARNINGS ISSUED...

SUMMARY OF 1100 AM EDT...1500 UTC...INFORMATION
-----------------------------------------------
LOCATION...25.1N 72.1W
ABOUT 170 MI...270 KM ENE OF SAN SALVADOR
ABOUT 725 MI...1170 KM SSE OF CAPE HATTERAS NORTH CAROLINA
MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS...125 MPH...205 KM/HR
PRESENT MOVEMENT...NW OR 320 DEGREES AT 17 MPH...28 KM/HR
MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE...943 MB...27.85 INCHES

Category One Hurricane (Sustained winds 74-95 mph). Very dangerous winds will produce some damage

Category Two Hurricane (Sustained winds 96-110 mph). Extremely dangerous winds will cause extensive damage

Category Three Hurricane (Sustained winds 111-130 mph).  Devastating damage will occur

Category Four Hurricane (Sustained winds 131-155 mph).  Catastrophic damage will occur

Category Five Hurricane (Sustained winds greater than 155 mph).  Catastrophic damage will occur

The forecast continues to show the storm skirting just east of Cape Hatteras in the early morning hours of Friday, then moving northeast and gradually pulling farther away from the coast during the day on Friday.  On this forecast track, the storm would stay a few hundred miles off the coast of Ocean City and gradually improving weather conditions would return to the Maryland beaches over the Labor Day weekend.  However, just a slight jog to the west of the official forecast track would bring hurricane weather closer to the coast, so the National Weather Service has posted a Hurricane Watch for the Maryland, Delaware, and Virginia beaches.  The images below are from our in-house Rapid Precision Model (RPM), which has a fairly high resolution 12 kilometer grid, and is usually quite accurate with the position of major storms in our area.  The sequence of RPM images shown starts at noon on Friday, then 5pm Friday and finally 10pm Friday evening.

More on the storm tonight at 5pm and 6pm on WBAL-TV.

Tom Tasselmyer

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